teardrop

Discovery

After finishing my weekend at Overland Expo, talking with so many people about their journey, thoughts of travel and of this community, I heard many consistencies in their stories and how our year long journey is so similar, but honestly very different as well. 

Speeding towards Arizona

Speeding towards Arizona

Overlanding for a few is a lifestyle. It's something we wake to every morning. It's our means of travel, our destinations and most importantly our discoveries. Unlike the vast majority of people who consider themselves "overlanders," planning multi-day or -week long adventures, we don't have a destination at all. Though words like nomads or vagabonds might come to mind, this is not us.

With a hope and desire to see new vistas, discover forgotten roads and find a special camp under the stars we travel this way on purpose. Our journey starts at the end of a paved road. It's finding the unknown, the out of the way place. It's planning for the unexpected and being realistic when we should consider a different route. It's not about danger, it's about balance.

Marshall Lake, Arizona

Marshall Lake, Arizona

Seeing groups in their large vehicles, capable of going almost anywhere, I look at our rig and think how lucky we are to have this amazing combination that too can get us almost anywhere. By some standards, our choice wouldn't even be on the radar. It's too small, some consider incapable, and may even be insane to tow something for thousands of miles. But we live outside, not inside. When it's cold, we layer up. When it's windy, we move to the other side of Teardrop. And when the road gets steep and bumpy? Well Teardrop is right there behind Jeep. They have never failed us, and we have put all our trust in her and Jeep.

Mesa Verde NP

Mesa Verde NP

After four months, Margaret and I have discovered so many wonderful things along our path. Some of the kindest people in Tennessee. The largest bunch of Turnip greens I've seen and only $3.50 USD. Antelop, Deer, Elk, Bison, Armadillo, endless streams of waterfowl, butterflies and insects all over. Dark sky in Big Bend and incredible winds at Mormon Lake. These are but a few recent discoveries and we have just begun our journey.

So are Teardrop and Jeep the perfect duo? Who's to say, but for us it's exceptional combination. More importantly it's our home.

How We Find Camp

Our First Night

Our First Night

Truth be told, sometimes we're just lucky or drove down the wrong road to discover an amazing location. Although unimpressive by some standards, we have camped at a Casino (Washington), a closed fruit stand (California), "Top Ten" RV park (Oregon) and several KOAs (Montana & Idaho). And although we are still holding out for a magical WalMart parking lot, truck stop or fairgrounds, we attempt to find that out-of-the-way location few get to, few find, and few consider. We don't care about running water, toilets or sewer dumps and surely don't like paying $30+ a night for "full hookups" either. 

What we do like are streams and lakes. Tall trees and singing birds. Haunting sounds we can't figure out. Foraging for delicate leaves, wild fungi and the smell of timber. To find these locations one has to do research, drive forest roads with hope. But sometimes you'll find the right combination next to a rail bridge, highway or edge of a developed camp ground.

 APPS We use several means for navigating to a location. In no particular order, All Stays, Ultimate Campgrounds, Freecampsites.net and GAIA. Each has it's own features and options, but none of them are a single solution. If we were just staying in improved or developed campgrounds and RV parks, either All Stays or Ultimate Campgrounds would suffice. Sadly finding details or even basic information about a primitive site 30 miles down forest roads isn't easy. People who use these locations often want to keep them secret or don't care about posting something online. We too are equally guilty as we've found amazing campsites by accident we'll probably never write about either. And we've only just started writing reviews and updates to some of the places we've been in the last week.

City Park with Interstate 20 views

City Park with Interstate 20 views

TIPS Use all the tools you have.  We don't use one app, we use all the apps and search for images, Forest Service, State and County websites. We cross-references the information so we don't end up at a closed, abandoned or just shitty location.

Take a chance. Drive that forest road, up a snowy trail or down a dirt road. Take the advice of a random stranger, especially if it happens while waiting at a left turn signal.

Get off the highway and on county roads. Here is where you'll see signs for local camp grounds, parks and recreation areas. Go into the local markets and gas stations where locals love to tell you about their favorite place or site. Note: having a unique camper and out-of-state plates helps a lot

Finally, don't settle. It's all to easy to give into the easy location, site or parking lot. It takes time to find the out of the way location, and it doesn't always work out. But be persistent, keep trying and have a little positive hope and you too will find an amazing camp spot away from 

 

Butterfly Highway

Several weeks ago, as we hiked through Jack's River to the Falls, we came across a wonderful sight. Eastern Tiger Swallowtails were all gathering at the perfect spot next to the falls. They would fly in over the fall, descend to a watering hole, then leave down the fall and along the river. It was a wonderful discovery to say the least. We left the falls to continue across the river to find a camp for the night, but the flow of endless butterflies was on our minds.

By chance, about a week later, we ended up in Tennessee miles down a forest road in Cherokee National Forest. Having discovered our initial campsite, Sylco, was abandoned (and recently destroyed by some locals) we continued on, to what turned out to be a gem. Not on our maps or navigation tools is a place called Big Frog. Several creeks meet to form a larger creek which rumbled over rocks and through the forest. As we setup camp, we commented on the butterflies all around.  

All day long there was an endless stream of Eastern, Spicebush and Pipeline Swallowtails, skippers and other butterflies following the stream. They'd stop at our camp, some longer than others, to rest or chase each other around, eventually continuing on their journey.  I was a wonderful addition to the sounds and peacefulness of this place.

Discoveries like these butterflies, frogs, wild edibles and hidden locations are why we travel the unbeaten path, county and forest roads.